Posts Tagged ‘Knitting Crafts’

How To Make A Knitting Needle Holder From Vintage Linens

Monday, February 10th, 2014

From our managing editor, Jami Boys.

You may not know it, but Jami, from An Oregon Cottage, has been writing on here for a year now. She handles all of our regular features like our weekly notebook, the giveaways, freebies, and round-up posts that you see on our site. She has become my right arm and I would be lost without her. Jami has a diverse background in frugal homemaking, manages her own blog, manages this blog, and is my new managing editor. How is she managing it all? I have no idea! But, I am so excited she has agreed to share her expertise on frugal homemaking with us!

How To Make A Knitting Needle Holder From Vintage Linens

I love vintage linens, especially linens that women have used their time and talents on to create works of art using embroidery, drawn-thread techniques, applique, crochet edgings and other needlework crafts. Since cruising thrift stores is a major pastime of mine, I have amassed quite a collection because I have a hard time leaving such treasures in a heap on a table.

How To Make A Knitting Needle Holder From Vintage Linens

However, I’m not a purist and I recognize that since we don’t use doilies, table runners and other small linen items in our homes anymore, I need to find other ways to be able to use and appreciate these little pieces of art once again. In the past I have made cafe curtains from old tea towels, pillows and tote bags from tablecloths and attached small embroidery pieces to the tops of ready-made pillows. Reusing these special pieces is also a way to use worn or stained linens that still have useable areas.

Since one of my other favorite hobbies is knitting, today I’m sharing how I transformed two vintage linens – a table runner and a pillowcase – into rolled knitting needle holders to organize and carry both my straight and circular needles. And the best part? It’s super easy and uses only straight line sewing!

How To Make A Knitting Needle Holder From Vintage Linens

Supplies Needed

(same for all types of linens)

Vintage linens – table runners and pillowcases for this example worked best because they were long enough for 13″ straight knitting needles (if making a needle holder for crochet hooks, tea towels would be long enough).
Coordinating ribbon – a 32″ piece of ribbon for tying in a bow. A grograin ribbon where both sides are the same is best.
Fabric marker – either vanishing or eraser style
Straight pins, sewing machine & coordinating thread

How To Make A Knitting Needle Holder From Vintage Linens

How To Make A Needle Holder From a Vintage Table Runner:

1. Fold linen piece with wrong sides together, using the needles you want it to hold as your measuring guide. Leave a top flap for folding over either over the needles or the other way, depending on if you want to see the tops of your needles (this example has the flap cover the needle tops, the next goes the other way leaving them visible). Pin edges where they meet.

2. Fold ribbon piece in half and insert folded edge 1/4″ into pinned edge; pin in place.

3. Set your machine to a longer stitch length (3.0) which makes a cleaner stitch for decorative sewing and doesn’t bunch as much as smaller stitches can.

4. Sew a straight line right along the edge of your linen. My embroidered runner had a crochet edge, so I sewed right where the crochet started.

5. As you come to the ribbon pinned to the edge, make sure it is straight and sew right over it, catching it in the edge.

6. Use a fabric marker to mark where the needle pockets will go.

7. Start at the bottom of the folded pocket and make marks at intervals for the individual needle pockets. For the 13″ bamboo straight needles I used here I made 1-1/4″ pockets which held sizes 13 to 5. You can make the pockets all different sizes as well for a custom needle holder (see below).

8. Use the marker and a ruler to make marks evenly up the inside pocket at about 3-4″ intervals – just enough that you can follow with the sewing machine.

9. Starting at the bottom of the large pocket, sew from the first mark straight up to the top of the pocket, using the marks as a guide. Bar-tack at the beginning and end to lock in stitches (sew back and forth one time before starting and ending the seam). Repeat to make remaining individual needle pockets.

How To Make A Knitting Needle Holder From Vintage Linens

Add your needles to the pockets. I like to organize them from largest to smallest.

How To Make A Knitting Needle Holder From Vintage Linens

Fold the flap over the needles, roll up keeping the embroidery visible, and tie with the ribbon. That’s it! Pretty easy, huh?

How To Make A Knitting Needle Holder From Vintage Linens

I also made a needle holder from a pillowcase that had embroidery and a scalloped crochet edging. The benefit of using a pillowcase is that it comes out thicker, liked a lined fabric.

How To Make A Knitting Needle Holder From Vintage Linens

How To Make A Needle Holder From a Vintage Pillowcase:

1. Follow the same steps outlined above, but make sure that your pillow decoration will fold over the way you want – either covering the tops of the needles or leaving them visible. You can see above that I left mine visible as I usually have the sizes marked on the needle tops and being able to see them will make them easier to find. If you plan on traveling with them and think they may fall out, cover them with the top flap.

2. Sew right along the edge of the case to make the seams for the large pocket before marking for your needle sizes. I made this case to hold some smaller 9″ bamboo needles and some circular needles.

3. When making custom sizes like this, it’s best to start measuring from each edge the sizes you want and work towards the center, so the last center pocket can be a larger or smaller size. In my example, the two outside circular needle pockets on each side (4 total) were 2-1/2″, the next three pockets on each side were 1/14″ and the center pocket is 2″ which ended up being perfect for the size 15″ needles.

How To Make A Knitting Needle Holder From Vintage Linens

You can make holders for all your needles – double pointed, circular, crochet hooks, or any others that you use. And wouldn’t these make a sweet gift for the crafters in your life? I know they would appreciate not only having their needles organized, but also the beauty of the original handiwork.

Vintage Linen Paint Brush Holder

Not a knitter? If you have paintbrushes to organize, you can make holders this same way for them, as this example from Jeannie Oliver showed on Instagram.

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54 Handmade Gift Ideas

Thursday, November 7th, 2013

54 Handmade Gifts from MomAdvice

Handmade gifts are one of my favorite things about the holidays – well, okay, any time of the year really! They are such a terrific way to show extra love to the special people in our lives, aren’t they?

And you know on Mom Advice we’re all about easy diy projects and loving our families and friends, so creating gifts for them is a no-brainer. Over the years I’ve shared many projects with you that I have personally given (or used myself!) and I’m excited to put them all in one place to give you some ideas and inspiration to make your own gifts for the holidays – or any occasion.

With an idea list this long (54!), I’ve decided to organize the list into four categories to help you find the perfect gift you’d like to recreate: knitted gifts, food gifts, gifts for the home, and personal gifts.

Happy crafting!

Knitted Gifts

1. Dovetail Cowl
2. 6-Stitch Knitted Ruffled Scarf
3. Knitted Coffee Cozies
4. Quick & Easy Knitted Boot Cuffs
5. Knitted Anthropologie-Inspired Scarflet
6. Cabled Knitted Headband
7. Waffle Stitch Fingerless Gloves
8. Gap-Tastic Cowl
9. Knitted Dishcloths (Part One)
10. Knitted Dishcloths (Part Two)
11. Knitted Ruffled Scarf
12. Gorgeous Gathered Scarfs
13. Merci Scarf
14. Shades of Gray Knitted Headband
15. Cozy Knitted Fingerless Gloves
16. Knitted Prayer Shawls

Food Gifts

17. Gingerbread Biscotti
18. Homemade Peppermint Marshmallows
19. Sugar & Spice Nut Mix
20. No-Bake Peppermint Cheesecakes in a Jar
21. Easy Microwave Peanut Brittle
22. Candy Bouquets
23. Honey Nut Granola
24. Cinnamon Delight Bread
25. Light Banana Oat Bread
26. Peppermint Syrup (for Homemade Peppermint Mochas)
27. Dark Chocolate & Sea Salt Brownies
28. Hot Cocoa Mix
29. Oreo Biscotti
30. Spiced Pumpkin Bread
31. Vanilla Scented Granola
32. Vanilla Chai Mix
33. Snickerdoodle Biscotti

Gifts For The Home

34. Paint Dipped Spoon Sets
35. Book Page Flower Bouquets
36. Pom Pom Flower Bouquets
37. DIY Monogrammed Wine Glasses
38. Chalkboard Conversation Bubble Cookie Jars
39. Coffee Filter Wreaths
40. Yarn Wreath For All Seasons
41. Hand Painted Mugs 
42. Yarn Ball Wreaths

Personal Gifts

43. Rosette Bib Necklace
44. Felt Fabric Brooches
45. Rolled Ribbon Rosette Hair Accessories
46. Close to My Heart Barrette
47.Treasure Chests (For a Boy or Girl)
48. Personalized CD
49. Movie Lover’s Gift Basket
50. Photo Journals With a Unique Spin
51. Oatmeal Cookes & Milk Bath Soak
52. Stretchy Ribbon Bookmarks
53. Rolled Rosette Rings
54. Candy Cane Bath Salts

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Baby Knitted Viking Hat for Halloween

Thursday, October 18th, 2012

Halloween is just around the corner and I wanted to share with you this adorable Knitted Baby Viking Hat as a fun way to dress up your little one. My dear friend’s daughter is my sweet little model for this knitted hat and I can’t wait to see her trick-or-treat in it this year!

Baby Knitted Viking Hat for Halloween

Pattern: Viking Girl Hat by Sara Fama; Pattern is $7.50, but you can use a coupon code (“Ravelry10″) to receive 10% off the pattern. Pattern kits can also be ordered with the yarn used in the pattern, but I was able to find similar colors of yarn at our local craft shop.  The pattern included the pattern for the boy hat as well as the hat in different sizes.

Needle Size: US 6 (I purchased this set of 12″ circulars for these hats)

Yarn: (Charcoal), Loops & Threads Charisma (Yellow), Hobby Lobby I Love This Cotton! (Ivory)

Notes:  This hat pattern taught me a lot of new techniques and would be a great pattern for someone wanting to expand their knitting knowledge. Beginning knitters will need to know how to knit bobbles (brief description is available in the pattern), create i-cords, knit on dpn’s, and knit in the round. Luckily, YouTube offers great video tutorials on these techniques to make creating this a little easier.

With this hat, I opted to make the boy version of the horns and added a little stuffing inside each one to make them stand up more instead of drooping flat. These were whip stitched in the same cream color).

The braids are really fun to knit and are knitted in three separate i-cords (attached by two rows of knitting at the top). I finished them with tightly knotted yarn and then grosgrain ribbon bows from my craft supplies.

 

3 Things That Helped Me With Making Wee Baby Hats

1.Bamboo 12″ circulars- Here is the honest truth. If you are super coordinated with double pointed needles, you can skip buying these and knit the wee baby hats in the round. I have found that knitting baby hats in the round was more of a challenge than I expected, and my mother-in-law recommended purchasing 12″ circulars so the hats do not have to be started on the DPN’s. These were a lifesaver and I will always use these for starting my hats. They do require a bit of coordination since they are shorter & smaller than your normal circulars, but they are worth the effort.  I applied my Swagbucks towards Amazon gift cards to help reduce the cost on these.

2. Bamboo 9″ Double Pointed Needles- Again, these are an off-brand needle and they were extremely rough so they held my stitches really well. As a beginner on these, these rough double pointed needles were key for me to get the hang of it without dropping stitches. It was a lot cheaper to buy these as a set and I did apply my Swagbucks towards the Amazon gift cards so I didn’t have to dip in my pocket to pay for them. You could go with a different length on these, but I opted for these 9″ ones and they still work great for the baby hats as well as the adult hats I knit.

3. A Good Ring Marker- I was using the kind that you just slipped over the needles and was finding that I was losing my starting stitch marker for knitting in the round. Look for ones that will slip onto the yarn and put that at the beginning of my round. It will really help you not lose your pace and keep you on track with your knitting.

Here is my first little Viking hat I made for my sweet friend’s baby! She is getting so big now and I love that this was in one of her first pictures! (picture credit: Nancy Lary Studios).

Happy Halloween, friends!

 

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Disclosure: The links to books and supplies are affiliate links and are provided so you can locate what you need quickly and easily. Feel free to order a book, but we encourage utilizing the library system and buying me some yarn instead.  Wouldn’t that just be so much more lovely?

 

 

 

What craft projects have you been working on? Feel free to share any links to what you are working on and be sure to friend me on Ravelry if you happen to be a knitter too! Access all of our craft fun on MomAdvice by visiting our Craft Section. Happy crafting, friends!

 

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